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Message from the Dean, Graduate School of Regional Policy
 
 
Dean, Graduate School of Regional Policy

Invitation to the research basis of regional policy, a study of problem-solving

 

Tadashi Masuda
Dean, Graduate School of Regional Policy


The Graduate School of Regional Policy was established as the first graduate school of Takasaki City University of Economics on April 1, 2000, when the Comprehensive Decentralization Law became effective in Japan and the country entered the era of full-scale decentralization. This timing was not coincidental.

On April 1, 1996, four years before the Graduate School of Regional Policy's establishment, TCUE opened the first Faculty of Regional Policy in Japan. The application for establishment of this faculty was made around the same time that the Decentralization Promotion Committee, an advisory body responsible to the Prime Minister, was established. It is an interesting coincidence representing the tide of the times that the first faculty of regional policy was established at the beginning of the era of Japanese decentralization.
 
After that, the graduate school developed smoothly and established itself as the highest institution of learning taking a leading role in the era of Japanese decentralization. With the founding of its doctoral course in March 2005, the graduate school created a complete research and education system, becoming a representative academic institute of regional policy both in name and reality. We were able to close a chapter in the attempt to systematize the regional policy study with publication in 2011 of the "Regional Policy Encyclopedia" (Keiso Shobo), authored mainly by full-time instructors of this school.
 
Meanwhile, as of the end of the academic year of 2012, the Graduate School of Regional Policy has provided society with numerous specialists on regional policy including 34 with doctoral degrees (including one doctor by thesis) and 250 with master's degrees.
 
In the age of universal university admissions, the bachelor's degree has lost its value as a proof of ability. In addition, we have not seen any remarkable growth in the percentage of students who go on to Japanese graduate schools in the social sciences. Therefore, insufficient human resources are supplied to society, even though needs for advanced and specialized knowledge in this field are increasing in many social spheres.
 
In order to counter this mismatch between needs and supply, TCUE's Graduate School of Regional Policy is eagerly engaged in the cultivation of human resources who can logically and practically address regional problems. We cordially welcome students who can share the awareness of these issues from throughout the nation and across the world.